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Forgive Us Our Lens

A group blog by the Knoxville News Sentinel photo staff

Father and son duo Brian Rupp and Connor Rupp were my favorite individuals to photograph at the Fanboy Expo. My father used to take me fishing, but some dads take their kid to comic book/science fiction conventions. Wearing a life vest in a bass boat is probably not nearly as fun as dressing up as these two. 

Father and son duo Brian Rupp and Connor Rupp were my favorite individuals to photograph at the Fanboy Expo. My father used to take me fishing, but some dads take their kid to comic book/science fiction conventions. Wearing a life vest in a bass boat is probably not nearly as fun as dressing up as these two. 

Halls’ Katie Scott beats the tag at third base from Farragut’s Kelsey Hughes in the Region 2-AAA semifinal on Monday, May 13, 2013.

I’m not a very good sports photographer, but I have managed to get by thanks to autofocus cameras and motor drives. This photograph was taken completely by accident. I wasn’t even looking through the viewfinder when I pointed a 400mm in the general direction of third base. This is why I am glad luck is sometimes on my side. 

Halls’ Katie Scott beats the tag at third base from Farragut’s Kelsey Hughes in the Region 2-AAA semifinal on Monday, May 13, 2013.

I’m not a very good sports photographer, but I have managed to get by thanks to autofocus cameras and motor drives. This photograph was taken completely by accident. I wasn’t even looking through the viewfinder when I pointed a 400mm in the general direction of third base. This is why I am glad luck is sometimes on my side. 

Posted by saulyoung 1 year ago
Tagged with:  #Knoxville  #Halls Softball

My photo editor asked me to come up with a way to photograph spring flowers including dogwood blooms that appeared fresh and different from what we are used to seeing.

An art show by Robert Creamer at the University of Tennessee’s Downtown Gallery on Gay Street immediately came to mind and served as the inspiration for the project. I remember seeing the show in 2010 and was stunned by the vivid images that his technique called scanography produced. (note: the print edition of this story mentions a different artist named Patri Feher who uses the same technique. The error (which unfortunately was mine) has been corrected.)

I wanted to try the technique in the field while the flowers and blooms were still either in the ground or on the tree. This would save me the trouble of having to dig something up or buy something at the local greenhouse. 

This technique requires little to no ambient light or the images will appear washed out. The dogwood blooms you see above were scanned in my bathroom at home since it was too bright outside when I cut the blooms from a friend’s tree. They would have wilted too much if I waited for the sun to go down. Also, it was incredibly windy the day I scanned these which made the redbud particularly difficult to scan without blurring.

The only light source affecting the flowers came from the scanner which results in the beautiful light patters that I cannot possibly even begin to imagine how to recreate with studio lights.

I used a Canon CanoScan LiDE 25 color document scanner that we normally use to scan prints at the office. It is USB powered so it allowed me to make the scans with just a laptop, two light stands and some clamps. Very little post-processing has been done to these photos. The black background is the result of the scanner’s light falloff. Most of the editing that I did in photoshop involved removing dust spots from the image. I did little toning to the final images. 

For some of the photos I clamped the scanner (very carefully!) to the light stands and positioned it in such a way that the blooms were touching the surface glass. Anything not touching the glass was very much out of focus as you can see in the photos here: http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2013/apr/20/kns-photographer-takes-a-new-approach-to-blooms/

The more successful scans came from flowers with flat faces. (sorry I’m not a botanist and don’t know what you call that…) Although I should note the columbine flower was my favorite, but the scan didn’t turn out well as most of the flower wasn’t touching the glass due to its shape.

The photos in this post show the setup for the scans that I made of the pansies and the redbud tree in the News Sentinel parking lot. The redbud scan was the only one that was not done in complete or almost-complete darkness. That is why the background on that particular image is lighter. (I should also note that I got several quizzical stares from coworkers as they left work as I was scanning the redbuds…)

Some of the failed scans can be seen in this post as well.

Many many thanks go to UT Gardens director Sue Hamilton for allowing me to scan the flowers after hours in the gardens. 

Tennessee basketball player Isabelle Harrison steps out of a photo booth during the Volscars awards ceremony. 
Nothing can ever prepare a photographer for these fun little moments. We just need to be lucky enough to have our cameras pointing in the right direction when they happen. 

Tennessee basketball player Isabelle Harrison steps out of a photo booth during the Volscars awards ceremony. 

Nothing can ever prepare a photographer for these fun little moments. We just need to be lucky enough to have our cameras pointing in the right direction when they happen. 

Tagged with:  #Knoxville  #Lady Vols

The Knoxville Marathon is one of my favorite and also most hated assignments. I hate it because I must be up by 5am. I love it because it is a creative challenge. There are only so many good photographs of people running-I would argue two-before it becomes repetitive. So for the sake of variety, I like to explore a variety of compositional elements when I’m chasing down the marathon runners. In the first photograph, I use the vertical shapes to give the photograph a unifying theme. In the last photo, I used the open space of a parking garage to frame a runner. There’s nothing great about these images, but they’re a little different. It’s these small differences that still fuel my love for photography.

This selection of photos represents various flowers, fungi, and other plants that were photographed while covering the Hikes of the Month from 2009-2013. 

A new gallery of 10 photos will post each day and can be seen on your smartphone, tablet or computer here.

Enjoy

Posted by adambrimer 1 year ago

Tagged with:  #hiking  #photography

This selection of photos represents various flowers, fungi, and other plants that were photographed while covering the Hikes of the Month from 2009-2013. 

A new gallery of 10 photos will post each day and can be seen on your smartphone, tablet or computer here.

Enjoy

Posted by adambrimer 1 year ago

Tagged with:  #hiking  #photography

These final 10 Hike of the Month photos span from June 2012 to March 2013.

In celebration of Knoxville News Sentinel writer Morgan Simmons and I completing our 50th Hike of the Month, I will be posting a set of 10 photos each day until Friday, April 5, 2013, when our 50th hike is published.

This set features a wide variety of photos from TVA River Bluff Small Wild Area, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness, Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness, Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Cumberland Trail, Panther Creek State Park, and the Cumberland Gap National Historic Park. 

This is the final set of photos. I hope you have enjoyed looking at some of my favorite photos from the hikes we have done. We as East Tennesseans are lucky to have such beauty and wonderful landscapes to explore. All of these photos were made in the region and are easily accessible by car and ultimately by foot. I hope you get a chance to explore.

Please look for hikes 51 and beyond in the near future!

Thanks for looking.

This is the second set of rock formation photos from the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area.

Here is another set of canopy and tree photos from our hikes. 

Enjoy.